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March 6, 2012 / dlw43

The Simple Future – Verb Tense and Aspect Lesson (Part 4 of 13)

Okay, now that you’ve learned about the Simple Past, it’s time to move on to the Simple Future. (If you haven’t yet learned about the Simple Past, click here.)

Before we start with the Simple Future, you need to understand that tense and aspect are different.  It will make this and following posts much easier to grasp.  (Go here for a quick explanation on the ways in which tense and aspect differ.)

We will be examining each aspect in its present, past, and future tense. In other words, we’ll be discussing each box in the Verb Tense and Aspect Chart in separate posts. Download, print out, and follow along on the Verb Tense and Aspect Chart.

The Simple Future has two forms and four main uses: to express a voluntary action, to express a promise, to express a plan, to express a prediction.  The two forms of the Simple Future are “will” and “be going to.”

“Will” to Express a Voluntary Action:

Examples:

I will go with you to the library.

Will you make dinner?

I will not watch the game.

I will take the kids to school.

Will you help me wash the car?

I will not clean your room.

“Will” to Express a Promise:

Examples:

I will call you later.

I will not stay out too late.

I will take you to the airport.

I will not tell anyone.

I will pay you on Friday.

I will not forget our appointment.

“Be Going to” to Express a Plan:

Examples:

I am going to fly to Japan next week.

Are you going to the Fleetwood Mac concert?

He is not going to spend his vacation in Los Angeles.

She is going to lose ten pounds by summer.

Are you going to drive to Las Vegas this weekend?

He is not going to work tonight.

“Will” or “Be Going to” to Express a Prediction:

Examples:

I will lose ten pounds in the next six weeks.

I am going to lose ten pounds in the next six weeks.

Will you move to Japan next year?

Are you going to move to Japan next year?

He will not win the election.

He is not going to win the election.

 Next: The Present Perfect

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